Mutant Mudds Deluxe Review

Mutant Mudds Title

A boy and his grannie fighting mud monsters with a water gun and a jet pack. That’s what you’re going to get when you jump into this adventure. Is that something you want? Continue reading to find out!

Presentation

Mutant Mudds Presentation

In a world where developers are fighting for the most advanced graphics, Mutant Mudds goes for a “12-bit” design. It’s refreshing to see that some developers are more focused on gameplay than amazingly astounding aesthetics. With that said, Renegade still has a fine-looking game here. Originally made for the 3DS, the designs of enemies and stages compliment that system, but it maintains appeal and purpose with its transfer over to the Wii U. Jumping to the background and foreground works the same way. Enemies continue to use their movement through the background and foreground to create hazardous platforming. In the end, you probably won’t be complaining about how the game looks. The music is a different story. While the classic 8-bit and 16-bit sounding tunes and occasionally funky beat are catchy, they are used over and over. At first, it’s enjoyable. The music slowly falls into a frustrating cycle and will most likely have you wishing there was more variety.

Story and Gameplay

Mutant Mudds Story

The game starts with this cutscene; Max and his grandmother are minding their own business at home when the earth is invaded by mud aliens (hence the term “mutant mudds”). In order to rid the planet of these creatures, Max goes on a mission to collect water sprites. These are supposed to be used to clean the land and vanquish the monsters when enough are found.

Controlling Max, you’re given very simple mechanics; you can walk, jump, shoot and duck. With these limited options, you have the abilities to take down all of the mud monsters. There are also monsters you cannot wash away with your water gun. You move, or you lose a precious heart. Precious is the correct word here because you only get three. This may sound like a lot at first, but as the levels become increasingly more difficult, you’re going to wish you had a few more. To start, your water gun will only allow one bullet on the screen at a time. As you collect golden diamonds dispersed throughout each stage, upgrades for your gun and jumping abilities will be unlocked. This will allow you to access secret and more demanding levels scattered around the game. Your goal for every normal stage is to collect 100 golden diamonds, collect the large water sprite and find the secret water sprite. There are also CGA-Land stages which can only be accessed after unlocking the grannie character who can use every power-up together unlike Max. These turn out to be some of the most difficult stages. The new addition to the deluxe version is the ghost stages. Each normal level has a mirrored ghost level. Here you cannot destroy any of the enemies. Even if you use a special ghost-busting gun, they return a few seconds after wasting some of the 10 provided bullets. This forces a different type of strategy upon gamers. All together there are 80 levels, and this doesn’t count how each level can be played differently when you switch between each of the upgrades. For only $10, that’s a win.

Mutant Mudds Gameplay

Despite the number of levels, Mutant Mudds doesn’t rely on quantity; quality matters too. You’ll quickly realize that the limited choices you have for moving and attacking translates to great gameplay. This and the ability for you to switch between 3 different depths creates a fun experience. A challenging game comes from seamlessly combining the mechanics with a variety of enemies, from a small mud monster that’s too short to shoot while standing to a mud pig that releases bombs from the sky. There are many different ways that the game challenges you, and each stage is based on different platforming skills. One level will test your ability to control the height of your jump while another may test how well you can time the need to change directions. Unlike the music, the gameplay won’t feel repetitive for a while. You’re also given a time limit for each level, applying some pressure to play at a faster rate.

While this all sounds great, a problem with the game is that there are no boss battles. To add on to this, there’s no big crowning moment in the game to help you feel satisfied or like you’ve achieved anything. Since you can generally choose which level to finish the game with, you won’t feel like there’s a finale. Instead, you’re likely to feel like the game is in a never-ending loop. In addition to not having a very engaging story, not having an ending that feels like a close to the game makes the story feel less interesting. Platformers may not rely on story, but there’s an empty feeling in this game.

 

Pros: Cons:
-Difficulty varies depending on your dedication to the game -No boss battles or big crowning moment
-Simple mechanics translate to a challenging platformer -The story is not too engaging
-Jumping between background and foreground creates different ways to play -Repetitive music
-Amount of content for the price is very reasonable (80 levels)
-Different items change how you can play each level

The Acosta Statement

$10 for a game with 80 levels? That’s amazing! The platforming is fun and the gameplay feels fresh to the genre. Everything is great, but why couldn’t there be more significant moments in the game like a boss battle or a final stage? This would help players feel like they’re actually achieving something as opposed to just playing a lot of levels. Good job on the game Renegade, but I’m waiting for those boss battles.

7/10

Mutant Mudds Meme